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Terroir 2017 wrap-up

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We’ve just returned from Terroir 2017, and can’t stop talking about what a great symposium it was. We’ll be writing about what we learned over the next few weeks, but here are a few of the highlights:

Terroir 2017

We loved the breakfast poutine, posed strategically next to the brand-new issue of MENU magazine! Other breakfast treats included mini buttermilk pancakes with syrup and blueberries, and baked beans with beef bacon.

Sarain Carson-Fox

The opening ceremony was both inspiring and beautiful. Lisa Odjig McHayle performed a traditional hoop dance, Philip Cote led a smudge ceremony, and Wikwemikong activist John Croutch asked why there are so few aboriginal restaurants in Canada. Above, Sarain Carson-Fox discussed the role of women as caretakers of life.

Hor mok

Lunch was provided by some of the best restaurants in Toronto, including the Drake, Boralia, and Antler, but we fell hard for the Hor Mok from Richshaw Bar.

Naomi Duguid

And, of course, a day full of speakers left us proud of this country’s culinary traditions and future. Here, culinary travel writer and cookbook author Naomi Duguid talks about three ways cooking can be inspired by travel.

In the late afternoon, we were treated to amazing Syrian food, served by Toronto’s Newcomer Kitchen, which was prepared and served by Syrian refugees. The kibbeh bel lakteen is pictured at the top of this post, and the Yalanji was equally delicious!

Look for lots more stories coming out of Terroir 2017 in the weeks ahead.